The Joie Stages vs. Joie Every Stages

Joie Stages Vs. Every Stages

The Main Differences

What separates the Joie Stages from its bigger brother – the Every Stages is the weight limit and the fact that they each cover different groups.

The Joie Stages: Group 0+/1/2
The Joie Every Stages: Group 0+/1/2/3

 

Name

Rear Facing Limit Forward Facing Harness Limit High Back Booster

Stages

0-18 KG 9-18 KG 18 – 25 KG

Every Stages

0-18 KG 9-18 KG 18 – 36 KG

So basically the Joie Stages is from birth to approximately 7 years old.
And the Joie Every Stages is from birth to approximately 12 years old.

There is also a difference in price

Joie Stages RRP: £150
Joie Every Stages RRP: £200

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Harness Difference

As the two car seats accommodate two different age groups there is a difference in the harness and booster top height as well:

 

Name Bottom Harness Height Top Harness Height Top Headrest Height in Booster Mode
Stages 25 CM 40 CM 42.5 CM
Every Stages 24 CM 48 CM 52.5 CM

There is also a difference in how much seat belt you need to install them rear facing.  The Joie Stages can be a little difficult to install with short seat belts (see ‘short seat belt method below’).

The Joie Every Stages takes up less seat belt when installing rear facing, so you will most likely not have any issues even if your car has short seat belts. However, it’s always good to know the ‘short seat belt method’ of installing, as this method can be used on all car seats with this typical belt path (aka infant car seats). 

Both car seats come with an integrated harness system that adjusts simultaneously and with one hand. The harness also easily tucks away into the seat when it’s time to start using the booster mode.

We recommend that the car seat is used rear facing full-out (to 18kg) before you start using it as a high back booster!

The Short Seat Belt Method

 

shor tseat belt guide

 

Buy the Joie Stages

Buy the Joie Every Stages

 

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This is the 4th article (of many) I wrote (and are still writing) for kindseats.com. As they have given their permission, I will continue to post my articles right here on my blog after they have been published by the company on their website/blog. 

I hope these articles will help you understand how very important rear facing is to the children in your care, be them your own or others and I hope that after reading these you learn something useful to teach others and spread the word.

The main focus of my articles is of course rear facing – but we will travel between car seat comparisons, crash testing, typical myths and so forth. Which reminds me! Please do check out my “Debunking Myths” series here on the blog as well as my “tip of the day” series – I am told they are very helpful. :) 

I don’t put a reference list in – but for most of my articles regarding extended rear facing, if you wish to see them, they are right here on the blog on the top menu under “Downloads”. It’s a full PDF file of all the extended rear facing research available on the net. If you can’t find something or are looking for something very specific, please let me know and I’ll try my hardest to help you find it. :) 

Therese has completed the ‘Advanced Child Car Seat Training Course’ at TRL (Transport Research Lab) and is a CPD accredited car seat expert. She blogs about in-car safety, car seats, tips, reviews, give-aways and advice. She’s a mum on a mission to change the law and raise awareness. She is also a breast feeding advocate and gentle parenting promoter who loves cloth nappies, baby-wearing, BLW and co-sleeping/bed-sharing.